This project has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 320294

EU

Dear mr. rector, Dear team of the University of Oviedo, Dear colleagues,   First of all, many thanks to the University of Oviedo, particularly the rector, Professor Silvia Gomez and her team for making it possible to host our fourth bEUcitizen General Assembly Meeting! A conference that is held in a time of great uncertainty for European citizens, faced with rising nationalism, growing xenophobia and populism, fear and anger. These are all culminating in last week’s…

EUROPE AT A CROSSROADS   Martin Seeleib-Kaiser (University of Oxford)   THE VOTE FOR BREXIT has opened an existential phase for the future of the EU. Irrespective of the political debates over the past year or so, the British referendum at its core was not about Britain’s membership in the EU, but about how the country copes with deindustrialization, deprivation and one of the highest levels of inequality in Europe. “Privatized Keynesianism” (C. Crouch) helped to conceal…

Five thousand people in Calais wanting to cross the Channel to the UK has meant my inbox is overflowing with invitations for interviews and top lines on ‘what is to be done’. What is striking about these requests is how many ask for brevity. ‘Tell us what you would do about Calais in 50 words. Be as specific as possible’, asked one journalist. The flood of requests (or perhaps I should say ‘swarm’) encapsulates what I find to be a real dilemma working in the field of ‘migration…

In recent months there has been considerable pressure on the idea of an unfettered right to free movement for EU citizens, especially those not in paid work. Belgium has sent letters to unemployed EU migrants ordering them to leave the country; Britain has called for a

Predictions that the city-state will dominate the future abound.  The idea has featured prominently in writings by pundits and futurists in recent publications in the Economist, Forbes, and elsewhere.  Paul Romer’s controversial model of the charter city has spawned an intense debate amongst academics and in the blogosphere.  But city-states are hardly new: they were a common feature of the European landscape for centuries, before the arrival of modern, centralised nation states in the…

For European citizens to claim rights on the basis of EU law – save for special circumstances – there should be an interstate requirement. Or, in other words, European citizens should have exercised their free movement rights before a number of important rights attached to European citizenship becomes available. This interstate element is vital, as it is about the division of competences between the EU and its Member States. If the cross-border requirement is not met, national law will…

The European elections in May have once again pitted the EU against national identities. In many countries so-called Eurosceptic parties carried the day. This happened most notably in the UK, where the UK Independence Party (UKIP) won by a landslide, humiliating the established parties, and most comprehensively the Liberal Democrats, whose leader wears his European identity – his mother is Dutch and his wife Spanish – proudly, but received a beating at the ballot box in return. Or so it…

The Networking European Citizenship Education conference of 2013 was titled “The EU and the promise of democracy: What can Citizenship Education and Civil Society contribute?” The assessment of the current state of the European Union (EU) during the first evening of the conference was not very positive, considering  the EU remaining in a deep economic crisis with youth unemployment up to 40% in the southern European states, modern populism with strong anti-European feelings and a…